segunda-feira, setembro 19, 2016

Marcas que viraram carcaças (bonitas por fora mas ocas)

Ler "The Decline Of Premium American Fashion Brands. What Happened, Ralph And Tommy?" é tomar consciência do cumprimento, em toda a linha, da profecia fácil do "hollowing", ou "radioclubização", de como uma marca forte e genuína se transforma numa carcaça, num aristocrata arruinado, fruto de deixarem os muggles à solta.
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É ver na prática a resposta das tribos aguerridas de Mongo aos gigantes que perderem a magia e julgam que podem tratar os clientes como plancton.
"I'm not the only one who feels that these iconic American brands have lost their luster. Many are on a downward spiral, hit by sluggish sales.
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What went wrong? How did premium American companies lose their way? And is there a new generation of labels that will fill the void?
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Charles Lawry, a professor at Pace University's business school who specializes in studying the luxury market, points to how high-end American brands have been creating cheaper products for decades now.
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In their new incarnations, these companies all faced new shareholder pressures to keep business booming. "Growth became more important than brand," ... "This meant everything from lowering the cost of manufacturing to making the brand accessible to new a wider spectrum of consumers."
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"There was an over-expansion and distribution into places like factory stores, which presented a tremendous economic opportunity," he says. "But it came at the expense of the brand. If you start training the consumer to believe that the brand is widely distributed in factory outlets, people who were once your core customer will start doing that, or lose interest in the brand altogether."
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To lower costs, many of these corporations shipped production to China and Vietnam, where labor was cheap. As a result, products suffered: People who weren't trained to work with premium leather or master expert tailoring could not be expected to create high-end merchandise on a massive scale. "With globalization and an effort to cut cost by going overseas, these megabrands that were once known for high quality started to see their quality deplete and decay,"
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It was also hard to predict consumer demand when outsourced orders had to be placed many months before they hit stores. This lead to bloated inventories. Karla Gallardo discovered this firsthand when she studied the luxury brand supply chain before cofounding her own brand, Cuyana, three years ago. "These businesses had to liquidate their inventories at low prices," she says. "When this happens once, twice, and three times, the customer gets used to buying on sale. This is a problem that gets compounded over time."
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In 2008, American prestige fashion hit new lows. "During the recession and post-recession periods, these brands went further by having a lot of these products trickle down to discount retailers," .
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In short, bargain prices robbed luxury brands of their mystique."
Depois, em "The Rise Of The High-Quality, Reasonably Priced, Direct-To-Consumer Brands" o artigo continua mas já com as marcas que estão a aparecer agora e a ganhar força:
"A younger generation of companies saw the decline of legacy American brands as an opportunity to redefine premium fashion and educate customers about how high-end goods are made.
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"Digital-first retail brands,
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"They architected brands that had a belief system built into them—about things like quality and social good—and a conversational tone built into its messaging that transparently exposed [those values].
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It has focused on creating women's clothing and accessories made by experienced craftsmen using quality materials so that consumers can enjoy their products for a long time—and perhaps even pass them on to their children.
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Another important distinction between these fashion startups and older apparel companies is that they are much less flashy. ... "Millennials are not as interested in logos as previous generations who gravitated toward things like the enormous Gucci Gs. Those garish logos would scare today's consumer away.
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Today, many people see high-end products as one-of-a-kind items—the antithesis of mass-produced commodities whose attention-grabbing logos turn consumers into advertisements. And a new wave of savvy entrepreneurs have built businesses on the idea of offering customers something that feels unique.
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"I understand what can happen when demand for your product explodes: The easiest way to respond to that on a knee-jerk basis is to aggressively pursue growth. But I think if you want to maintain status as a luxury brand, you have to temper this desire." A little self-control can go a long way, even in fashion."
A propósito deste parágrafo final mais dois artigos:


  • "How Mansur Gavriel Beat the ‘It’ Bag Hangover"

  • "“Certain articles of clothing, once they become coveted by everyone, everyone gets over it,” says street-style photographer Tommy Ton, who shot the brand’s spring/summer 2016 presentation. Not Mansur Gavriel’s.
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    “In addition to being great designers,” he says, “they’re also good businesswomen. They’re careful not to overdistribute.”
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    Mansur Gavriel restricts its retail partners to a few high-end boutiques and department stores and limits the number of bags a retailer can order." 

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