domingo, Novembro 27, 2011

Imaginem o pior, imaginem o desastre. O que falhou?

Muitas PMEs ainda não fazem um orçamento para o ano seguinte.
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Admitamos que algumas o fazem.
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Muitas PMEs com um orçamento, fazem como MFL e TdS, não o acompanham, só no final do ano é que descobrem que não vai ser cumprido e inventam medidas de última hora.
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Admitamos que uma PME fez o seu orçamento para 2012, definiu objectivos e estabeleceu iniciativas estratégicas para os atingir.
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Por que não se interrogam, ainda em 2011, sobre o que é que pode correr mal? Por que pode falhar o cumprimento dos objectivos para 2012? Por que não realizar uma análise premortem?
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" If you gather a team of experienced leaders and ask them why past projects failed, the explanations flow readily: The project was bigger than we realized … we were too slow … our design was flawed … we were operating from faulty assumptions … the market changed … we had the wrong people … our technology didn’t work … our strategy was unclear … our costs were too high … our organization sabotaged us … the competition was tougher than we thought … we reorganized ourselves to death … we fought among ourselves … our strategy was flawed … our strategy was good but our execution was lousy … we ran into unexpected bottlenecks … we misunderstood our customers … we were short on resources … the economics didn’t work … we got killed by internal politics …
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Unfortunately, most teams never create such a list at the start of any project. That’s not in the genetic code of most innovators, who are (and who need to be) gung-ho optimists. But what if you ask your team to imagine a failure in advance, and explain why it happened? Research by Deborah Mitchell of the Wharton School, J. Edward Russo of Cornell, and Nancy Pennington of the University of Colorado found that “prospective hindsight”—imagining that an event has already occurred—increases the ability to correctly identify reasons for future outcomes by 30 percent.

Gary Klein, author of Sources of Power: How People Make Decisions and The Power of Intuition, builds on this “prospective hindsight” theory. He suggests that a premortem exercise frees people to express worries that they might otherwise suppress for fear of appearing disloyal or undermining the team’s confidence. Klein says the process reduces the kind of “damn-the-torpedoes attitude often assumed by people who are overinvested in a project.” People participating in a premortem might raise red flags before, rather than after, failure. 


So try this nightmare exercise: Imagine disaster. Ask why you failed; list all the possible reasons. Then do your best to counter those mistakes before they have a chance to occur. Most launches die from self-inflicted wounds. It means that if you’re willing to take a clear-eyed look at the forces seemingly conspiring to derail your next launch, you’ll probably find that the most powerful factors are actually under your control."
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Imaginem que um comercial negoceia com a sua chefia um objectivo de vendas para 2012.
OK, existe uma estratégia que a empresa como um todo está a implementar...
Viajar rapidamente até final de Novembro de 2012, olhar para trás e listar o que é que pode ter corrido mal e minado a possibilidade de atingir os objectivos...
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Regressar ao presente e ... é possível desenvolver medidas preventivas que impeçam ou minimizem os efeitos do que pode vir a correr mal? É possível enrobustecer as iniciativas estratégicas definidas?
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Trechos retirados de "Demand", o último livro de Adrian Slywotzky.
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BTW, adoro viagens ao futuro...

1 comentário:

CCz disse...

http://www.tomspencer.com.au/2008/11/08/daniel-kahneman-on-improving-the-decision-making-process/